Wednesday, 23 September 2020

 

Julia #Kristeva’s POSSESSIONS: Not just a crime story.

 


And not just a throw-back to the good old days of the 90s, when people freely travelled, jetting between New York, Paris, London, and a fictitious place in Bulgaria. A respected academic, Kristeva knows how to hang her feminist ideas on a crime story a la Agatha Christie. Gloria is found dead – raped (?), stabbed to the heart, and decapitated. One of the people in the house must have done it, right? Spoiler alert: More than one did it. I don’t mind spoiling the ending for you because solving the crime isn’t the point of the book. Learning about life is. Here are some of Kristeva’s insights:

Self-denial is a delusion of grandeur, disguising trauma.

Art encourages the apotheosis of the self…it is a secular religion and the conversion of civilization to museums.

Translation: the problematical effort to shift the meaning of words adequately from one language to another.

Music as character-builder: It is concerned with tempo and measure and helps to make feelings “keep time”.

Journalists: the modern equivalent of priests. They manipulate everything and understand nothing.

Some people talk because they need an audience. Their message: I am not asking you to say what you think of what I say. I’m merely asking the impossible, that you should bear witness to my being and to my being okay.

Friday, 17 July 2020


REVIEWS  OF THE ROAD TO GESUALDO: “BORGIAS LITE”


Amazon.com corrected their mistake: I’m once again Erika Rummel.
Here are excerpts from two reviews of The Road to Gesualdo”:

An intelligently rambling look at life in 1500s Italy…I suppose you could call it “Borgias Lite.”

A pleasantly chaotic setting that gives us a grand scope of just how influential the Renaissance was starting to become across southern Europe, with scenes set from backwoods villages to Vatican City itself. Rummel does a particularly great job here at examining the curious cooperation and conflicts between the superstitious, pre-science Medieval period…and the rational, capitalist, politically savvy, science-embracing mercantile class.

People will enjoy the leisurely stroll through the very real-seeming daily lives of courtesans, countesses, merchants, and priests…even if there is always a rational explanation for everything and no sexy vampires.
(Jason Bettus, Chicago Center for Literature and Photography)


A vivid historical novel blending romance and intrigue in a female-centered story of strong women who rise above their upbringings and duty to become more effective forces in charge of their lives.

Rummel’s attention to strong characterization and capturing the sights, smells, and atmosphere of 16th century Italy contributes to a vivid story…which concludes with a satisfying twist.
(D. Donovan, Senior Reviewer, Midwest Book Review)

Thursday, 16 July 2020

MY NEW NOVEL IS OUT: THE ROAD TO GESUALDO

If you look it up on amazon.co, you'll find it under "Erika Rimmel" -- no, I haven't changed my name.  I'm still Erika Rummel. Amazon made a mistake and has promised to correct it within 24 hours. 

Wednesday, 14 November 2018

AND NOW IN HEBREW: FRANCISCO VITORIA'S TREATISES ON THE INDIANS AND ON THE RIGHT TO MAKE WAR.

NATHAN RON'S TRANSLATION HAS JUST BEE PUBLISHED.